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ESPN’s Architecture at Scale – Operating at 100,000 Duh Nuh Nuhs Per Second

Stats Internet’s #1 sports website. Top 10 of all sites. 5th largest website among men ages 18-54 (Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Yahoo are bigger). Powered by only a few hundred servers. A few dozen serve the major portions of the site, like the front-page service. Only a couple of dozen engineers. Peak 100,000 requests per second. Peak event was the World Cup. Sports specific data is gigabytes in size. Stack Java based. Oracle database, AQ Streams Message Broker WebSphere MQ Interesting integration of people on the ground as sources of data as well as automated feeds JMS Broker

(Full Story: http://highscalability.com/blog/2013/11/4/espns-architecture-at-scale-operating-at-100000-duh-nuh-nuhs.html )

Oracle Makes Java More Relevant Than Ever — For Free | Wired

the Java development platform is experiencing a renaissance of sorts, as hot web companies grow out of their mid-2000s programming tools and look for something that can help them more effectively juggle tens or even hundreds of millions of users. Invented by Sun, Java is now overseen by Oracle, and yet, as those big web companies embrace Java in such a big way, Oracle is on the outside looking in. When it was founded back in 2006, Twitter’s programmers used Ruby on Rails. But as the service grew, it became clear that Ruby wasn’t the best way to juggle tweets from millions of people across the globe. Now Twitter runs on Java, as do large parts of Google, FourSquare, and Linkedin. Inside these companies, there are thousands of servers running the Java Virtual Machine, or JVM, a piece of software the executes programming code. And the JVM is built by Oracle. But it’s available under an open source license, which means the company is fostering one of the hottest trends on the internet, w

(Full Story: Oracle Makes Java More Relevant Than Ever — For Free | Wired)

The Second Coming of Java: Clinton-Era Relic Returns to Rule Web | Wired

But over the past few years, Java has evolved into something very different. It has quietly become the primary foundation for most the net’s largest and most ambitious operations, including Google, LinkedIn, Tumblr, and Square, as well as Twitter. “It’s everywhere,” says Krikorian. In the summer of 2011, Bob Lee — the chief technology officer at Square and a former engineer at Google — announced at a prominent software conference that the web was “on the cusp of a Java renaissance.” Two years later, this renaissance is upon us. Like Twitter, many other companies have realized that Java is particularly well suited to building web services that can stand up to the massive amounts of traffic streaming across the modern internet. “Java is really the only choice when it comes to the requirements for a company like ours — extreme performance requirements and extreme scalability requirements,” Lee says of Square,

(Full Story: The Second Coming of Java: Clinton-Era Relic Returns to Rule Web | Wired)

Plumbr – java memory leak detection

Our leak detection solution grew out of a combination of two things: our own daily need and research interest. It lead us to inventing a method to automatically understand how an application should behave by distinguishing anomalies in its memory usage patterns. And we are on the track of revolutionizing the way you think about monitoring tools.

(Full Story: http://plumbr.eu/about-us )

If Java Is Dying, It Sure Looks Awfully Healthy | Dr Dobb’s

On GitHub, which is the mecca for hip projects these days, Java was in the #3 slot both last year and this year as the language of choice for projects. (Its position there below JavaScript and Ruby is somewhat historical: gitHub was originally a primarily Ruby repository.) On the controversial Tiobe index, Java retains its overall #2 place, behind C. (C and Java have gone back and forth for the top two spots since 2002). And on Ohloh, the biggest portal to stats on the open-source community, Java retains the same percentage of total commits that it has enjoyed for the last seven years.

(Full Story: http://www.drdobbs.com/jvm/if-java-is-dying-it-sure-looks-awfully-h/240162390/ )

The Second Coming of Java: Clinton-Era Relic Returns to Rule Web | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

But over the past few years, Java has evolved into something very different. It has quietly become the primary foundation for most the net’s largest and most ambitious operations, including Google, LinkedIn, Tumblr, and Square, as well as Twitter. “It’s everywhere,” says Krikorian. In the summer of 2011, Bob Lee — the chief technology officer at Square and a former engineer at Google — announced at a prominent software conference that the web was “on the cusp of a Java renaissance.” Two years later, this renaissance is upon us. Like Twitter, many other companies have realized that Java is particularly well suited to building web services that can stand up to the massive amounts of traffic streaming across the modern internet. “Java is really the only choice when it comes to the requirements for a company like ours — extreme performance requirements and extreme scalability requirements,” Lee says of Square,

(Full Story: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/09/the-second-coming-of-java/ )

Oracle Makes Java More Relevant Than Ever — For Free | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

the Java development platform is experiencing a renaissance of sorts, as hot web companies grow out of their mid-2000s programming tools and look for something that can help them more effectively juggle tens or even hundreds of millions of users. Invented by Sun, Java is now overseen by Oracle, and yet, as those big web companies embrace Java in such a big way, Oracle is on the outside looking in. When it was founded back in 2006, Twitter’s programmers used Ruby on Rails. But as the service grew, it became clear that Ruby wasn’t the best way to juggle tweets from millions of people across the globe. Now Twitter runs on Java, as do large parts of Google, FourSquare, and Linkedin. Inside these companies, there are thousands of servers running the Java Virtual Machine, or JVM, a piece of software the executes programming code. And the JVM is built by Oracle. But it’s available under an open source license, which means the company is fostering one of the hottest trends on the internet, w

(Full Story: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/09/oracle_java/ )

Metrics – a Java library which gives insight into what your code does

Developed by Yammer to instrument their JVM-based backend services, Metrics provides a powerful toolkit of ways to measure the behavior of critical components in your production environment.

With modules for common libraries like Guice, Jetty, Log4j, Apache HttpClient, Ehcache, Logback, Spring and reporting backends like Ganglia and Graphite, Metrics provides you with full-stack visibility.

(Full Story: http://metrics.codahale.com/ )

Jodd | Jerry

Jerry is a jQuery in Java. Jerry is a fast and concise Java Library that simplifies HTML document parsing, traversing and manipulating. Jerry is designed to change the way that you parse HTML content.

(Full Story: Jodd | Jerry)

Understanding JVM Internals | Java SE 7 Edition

This article explains how the JVM works, its structure, how it executes Java bytecode, the order of execution, examples of common mistakes and their solutions, as well as the new features in Java SE 7 Edition.

(Full Story: Understanding JVM Internals | Java SE 7 Edition)

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