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Railsonfire – Continuous Integration for Ruby in the Cloud

We provide simple Continuous Integration for Ruby apps hosted on GitHub. Stop wasting time and money maintaining your own server. In less than two minutes you can go from first login to testing your code.

(Full Story: Railsonfire – Continuous Integration for Ruby in the Cloud)

Twitter Shifting More Code to JVM, Citing Performance and Encapsulation As Primary Drivers

Last year the company announced that both its back-end message queue and Tweet storage had been re-written in Scala, and in the spring of 2010 the search team at Twitter started to rewrite the search engine. As part of the effort, Twitter changed the search storage from MySQL to a real-time version of Lucene. More recently the team announced that they were replacing the Ruby on Rails front-end for search with a Java server they called Blender. This change resulted in a 3x drop in search latencies.

(Full Story: Twitter Shifting More Code to JVM, Citing Performance and Encapsulation As Primary Drivers)

Active Admin – administration framework for Ruby on Rails

Active Admin is a Ruby on Rails plugin for generating administration style interfaces. It abstracts common business application patterns to make it simple for developers to implement beautiful and elegant interfaces with very little effort.

(Full Story: Active Admin – administration framework for Ruby on Rails)

Cloud Foundry – open platform as a service

The industry’s first open platform as a service. Run your Spring, Rails and Node.js applications. Deploy from your IDE or command line.

(Full Story: Cloud Foundry – open platform as a service)

RSpec is for the literate

Another fringe benefit of TDD which has fallen somewhat by the wayside, in my opinion, is the notion that the tests can double as the documentation—documentation which, by its nature, can never fall out of sync with the source code. This feature of TDD was a Big Deal back when I was first getting into open source; it was very popular to reply “just read the tests” in response to the question “where is the documentation”, and this was a novel change from the heavyweight documentation which had up until then been considered one of the requisites of software development.

(Full Story: RSpec is for the literate)

Code School – your path to better code

An interactive online marketplace where you can learn to code directly in the browse

(Full Story: Code School – your path to better code)

Matt Raible’s – Comparing JVM Frameworks (April 2011 updarte)

Choosing a Framework:
1. Developer Productivity
2. Developer Perception
3. Learning Curve
4. Project Health
5. Developer Availability
6. Job Trends
7. Templating
8. Components
9. Ajax
10. Plugins or Add-Ons
11. Scalability
12. Testing Support
13. i18n and l10n
14. Validation
15. Multi-language Support (Groovy / Scala)
16. Quality of Documentation/Tutorials
17. Books Published
18. REST Support (client and server)
19. Mobile / iPhone Support
20. Degree of Risk

(Full Story: Matt Raible’s – Comparing JVM Frameworks (April 2011 updarte))

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