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Unlocking the Power of Stable Teams with Twitter’s SVP of Engineering

1. Build strong teams first. Assign them problems later. 2. Keep teams together. 3. Go modular. Remove dependencies. 4. Establish a short, regular ship cycle.

(Full Story: http://ift.tt/1g6gCwC )

Oracle Makes Java More Relevant Than Ever — For Free | Wired

the Java development platform is experiencing a renaissance of sorts, as hot web companies grow out of their mid-2000s programming tools and look for something that can help them more effectively juggle tens or even hundreds of millions of users. Invented by Sun, Java is now overseen by Oracle, and yet, as those big web companies embrace Java in such a big way, Oracle is on the outside looking in. When it was founded back in 2006, Twitter’s programmers used Ruby on Rails. But as the service grew, it became clear that Ruby wasn’t the best way to juggle tweets from millions of people across the globe. Now Twitter runs on Java, as do large parts of Google, FourSquare, and Linkedin. Inside these companies, there are thousands of servers running the Java Virtual Machine, or JVM, a piece of software the executes programming code. And the JVM is built by Oracle. But it’s available under an open source license, which means the company is fostering one of the hottest trends on the internet, w

(Full Story: Oracle Makes Java More Relevant Than Ever — For Free | Wired)

The Second Coming of Java: Clinton-Era Relic Returns to Rule Web | Wired

But over the past few years, Java has evolved into something very different. It has quietly become the primary foundation for most the net’s largest and most ambitious operations, including Google, LinkedIn, Tumblr, and Square, as well as Twitter. “It’s everywhere,” says Krikorian. In the summer of 2011, Bob Lee — the chief technology officer at Square and a former engineer at Google — announced at a prominent software conference that the web was “on the cusp of a Java renaissance.” Two years later, this renaissance is upon us. Like Twitter, many other companies have realized that Java is particularly well suited to building web services that can stand up to the massive amounts of traffic streaming across the modern internet. “Java is really the only choice when it comes to the requirements for a company like ours — extreme performance requirements and extreme scalability requirements,” Lee says of Square,

(Full Story: The Second Coming of Java: Clinton-Era Relic Returns to Rule Web | Wired)

The Second Coming of Java: Clinton-Era Relic Returns to Rule Web | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

But over the past few years, Java has evolved into something very different. It has quietly become the primary foundation for most the net’s largest and most ambitious operations, including Google, LinkedIn, Tumblr, and Square, as well as Twitter. “It’s everywhere,” says Krikorian. In the summer of 2011, Bob Lee — the chief technology officer at Square and a former engineer at Google — announced at a prominent software conference that the web was “on the cusp of a Java renaissance.” Two years later, this renaissance is upon us. Like Twitter, many other companies have realized that Java is particularly well suited to building web services that can stand up to the massive amounts of traffic streaming across the modern internet. “Java is really the only choice when it comes to the requirements for a company like ours — extreme performance requirements and extreme scalability requirements,” Lee says of Square,

(Full Story: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/09/the-second-coming-of-java/ )

Oracle Makes Java More Relevant Than Ever — For Free | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

the Java development platform is experiencing a renaissance of sorts, as hot web companies grow out of their mid-2000s programming tools and look for something that can help them more effectively juggle tens or even hundreds of millions of users. Invented by Sun, Java is now overseen by Oracle, and yet, as those big web companies embrace Java in such a big way, Oracle is on the outside looking in. When it was founded back in 2006, Twitter’s programmers used Ruby on Rails. But as the service grew, it became clear that Ruby wasn’t the best way to juggle tweets from millions of people across the globe. Now Twitter runs on Java, as do large parts of Google, FourSquare, and Linkedin. Inside these companies, there are thousands of servers running the Java Virtual Machine, or JVM, a piece of software the executes programming code. And the JVM is built by Oracle. But it’s available under an open source license, which means the company is fostering one of the hottest trends on the internet, w

(Full Story: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/09/oracle_java/ )

Finagle, from Twitter

Finagle is a network stack for the JVM that you can use to build asynchronous Remote Procedure Call (RPC) clients and servers in Java, Scala, or any JVM-hosted language. Finagle provides a rich set of protocol-independent tools.

(Full Story: Finagle, from Twitter)

Bootstrap, from Twitter

Bootstrap is a toolkit from Twitter designed to kickstart development of webapps and sites.It includes base CSS and HTML for typography, forms, buttons, tables, grids, navigation, and more.

(Full Story: Bootstrap, from Twitter)

Bootstrap, from Twitter

Bootstrap is a toolkit from Twitter designed to kickstart development of webapps and sites.It includes base CSS and HTML for typography, forms, buttons, tables, grids, navigation, and more.

(Full Story: Bootstrap, from Twitter)

Twitter open sources Storm a mapreduce framework

I’ve only scratched the surface on Storm. The “stream” concept at the core of Storm can be taken so much further than what I’ve shown here — I didn’t talk about things like multi-streams, implicit streams, or direct groupings. I showed two of Storm’s main abstractions, spouts and bolts, but I didn’t talk about Storm’s third, and possibly most powerful abstraction, the “state spout”. I didn’t show how you do distributed RPC over Storm, and I didn’t discuss Storm’s awesome automated deploy that lets you create a Storm cluster on EC2 with just the click of a button.

(Full Story: Twitter open sources Storm a mapreduce framework)

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