Archive | November, 2010

jBPM5 Roadmap – JBoss Community

This document describes a proposal for the jBPM5 roadmap, based on the feedback of the community on the suggested features in the jBPM5 Request for Comments. It will constantly be updated with the necessary details (feature lists, dates) based on community feedback, etc.
(Link: jBPM5 Roadmap – JBoss Community)

jBPM best practices

There’s no perfect rule to model your workflow, it depends on the needs of your process, on the actors involved, and so on. Anyway I wanted to share with you some rules of thumb on which developers usually agree. Give me your feedback if you agree or you want to propose alternatives.
(Link: jBPM best practices)

Red Hat Buys Makara, Adds PaaS to Its Cloud Mix

But unlike Windows Azure – or any other popular PaaS offering, for that matter – Makara isn’t relegated to running in any particular environment. Yes, the service is hosted atop Amazon EC2, but Makara customers can implement the platform atop pretty much any virtualized infrastructure. Che said that means Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization-, Xen, or VMware-based internal or public clouds, as well as internal IaaS software such as Eucalyptus or Cloud.com’s CloudStack. Makara can serve as the platform for hybrid cloud environments, too.
(Link: Red Hat Buys Makara, Adds PaaS to Its Cloud Mix)

ModeShape – is a JCR 2.0 (JSR-283) implementation that provides access to content stored in many different kinds of systems

ModeShape (formerly “JBoss DNA”) is a JCR 2.0 (JSR-283) implementation that provides access to content stored in many different kinds of systems. A ModeShape repository isn’t yet another silo of isolated information, but rather it’s a JCR view of the information you already have in your environment: files systems, databases, other repositories, services, applications, etc.
(Link: ModeShape – is a JCR 2.0 (JSR-283) implementation that provides access to content stored in many different kinds of systems)

jBPM5: Are your business processes ready for the future? on Vimeo

Description: Business Process Management (BPM) technology offers you the capability to better manage and streamline your business processes. jBPM5 continues its vision in this area by offering an open-source, lightweight, embeddable process engine for executing business processes. Combined with the necessary services and tooling, this allows not only developers but also business users to manage your processes more efficiently throughout their entire lifecycle. A lot is happening in the BPM area as well, with the introduction of the BPMN 2.0 standard, the increasing interest in more dynamic and adaptive processes, integration with business rules and event processing, etc. This presentation will show you how jBPM5 tackles these challenges and give you an overview of the most important features.
(Link: jBPM5: Are your business processes ready for the future? on Vimeo)

Applying complex event processing (CEP)

Into to CEP
Drools Vision
Drools Fusion: CEP extensions
Event Declaration and Semantics
Event Cloud, Streams and the Session Clock
Temporal Reasoning
Sliding Window Support
Streams Support
Memory Management
(Link: Applying complex event processing (CEP))

Drools.Net

Drools.NET is a Business Rules Engine (BRE) based on Charles Forgy’s Rete algorithm. Developers can now exploit a powerful Rule Engine through a completely managed .NET code base! Drools.NET is based on Jboss Rules, and comes with all the features of that Rules Engine.
(Link: Drools.Net)

CTO Tuesdays #42: Should you bet on jBPM?

Recorded: November 4, 2010
Duration: 48 min

Active Endpoints CTO Michael Rowley looks at jBPM and asks the kinds of questions that he believes architects and project managers should ask before betting a project on jBPM technology.
(Link: CTO Tuesdays #42: Should you bet on jBPM?)