Archive | April, 2013

McDonald’s Theory

I use a trick with co-workers when we’re trying to decide where to eat for lunch and no one has any ideas. I recommend McDonald’s. An interesting thing happens. Everyone unanimously agrees that we can’t possibly go to McDonald’s, and better lunch suggestions emerge. Magic! It’s as if we’ve broken the ice with the worst possible idea, and now that the discussion has started, people suddenly get very creative. I call it the McDonald’s Theory: people are inspired to come up with good ideas to ward off bad ones.

(Full Story: https://medium.com/what-i-learned-building/9216e1c9da7d )

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LinkedIn: A Story About Silicon Valley’s Possibly Unhealthy Need for Speed – Businessweek

Scott and a number of LinkedIn’s top engineers reached their breaking point with the company’s infrastructure in November 2011. This was just a few months after the company’s blockbuster IPO, and investors were still obsessing over LinkedIn’s every move. No matter. Scott and his team decided to begin Project Inversion, in which they would stop all engineering work on new features and have every able body focus on rebuilding the company’s infrastructure from scratch. Scott had a theory that something better would emerge. Truth be told, he wasn’t sure. “It was a scary thing,” he says.

(Full Story: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-04-29/linkedin-a-story-about-silicon-valleys-possibly-unhealthy-need-for-speed#r=hp-ls )

Obsidian Testing – An Open Source Project

Obsidian is a unit test generator for java built for the JUnit framework. Obsidian concentrates on building standardized test implementations that are comprehensive and easy to maintain, allowing the test engineer to concentrate on test case instantiation. This is in contrast to the strategies of many unit test generators, which focus on generating test cases. We have found that these generated test cases are coupled with implementations that are often difficult to maintain and sometimes non comprehensive. Obsidian employs a set of design patterns that are built around a method test’s necessities for compilation, exception handling, and test case iteration to generate these implementations.

(Full Story: http://www.obsidiantest.org/ )

Why Open Source Software Is Like Burning Man (Only Better) | Wired

The modern web is built on open source software — that’s the only way it can evolve with such speed — and as even the largest and oldest of tech companies embrace this reality, projects like OpenStack will become the norm. They’ll span more developers and more companies and more code. In many ways, Monty Taylor is a metaphor for things to come.

(Full Story: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/04/new-hackers-taylor/ )

The Secret History of OpenStack, the Free Cloud Software That’s Changing Everything | Wired

That’s what OpenStack is: a way for the rest of the world to compete with Amazon. “Amazon [is] at war with every IT vendor out there,” says Sebastian Stadil, the CEO of an open source cloud management outfit Scalr, the founder of the Silicon Valley Cloud Computing group, and a former resident of the Rainbow Mansion. “I think one of the reasons OpenStack is getting so much traction — despite, to be frank, iffy stability — is that it represents the industry’s only hope to survive.”

(Full Story: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/04/openstack/all/ )

Scaling Agile @ Spotify with Tribes, Squads, Chapters & Guilds

Dealing with multiple teams in a product development organization is always a challenge! One of the most impressive examples I’ve seen so far is Spotify. I’ve had the pleasure of working with Spotify on and off ever since the company was founded, and it’s one of the few companies I’ve seen with a truly agile culture. Spotify has grown a lot lately and now has hundreds of developers divided into 30 agile teams spread over 4 cities in 3 timezones. So how is this managed? Check out the article: Scaling Agile @ Spotify with Tribes, Squads, Chapters and Guilds.

(Full Story: Scaling Agile @ Spotify with Tribes, Squads, Chapters & Guilds)

Siege is an http load testing and benchmarking utility.

It was designed to let web developers measure their code under duress, to see how it will stand up to load on the internet. Siege supports basic authentication, cookies, HTTP and HTTPS protocols. It lets its user hit a web server with a configurable number of simulated web browsers. Those browsers place the server “under siege.”

(Full Story: http://www.joedog.org/siege-home/ )

Vagrant | Fly Dillon Fly

We needed to ensure that all developers ran environments that were the same in all practicable ways to production. This meant: The same version of CentOS The same version of PHP The same version of Apache The same version of Memcached The same version of MySQL The same Apache modules The same webroot The same folder permissions The same log directories The same. The same. The same.

(Full Story: http://flydillonfly.wordpress.com/2012/11/22/vagrant/ )

Scaling Agile @ Spotify with Tribes, Squads, Chapters & Guilds

Dealing with multiple teams in a product development organization is always a challenge! One of the most impressive examples I’ve seen so far is Spotify. I’ve had the pleasure of working with Spotify on and off ever since the company was founded, and it’s one of the few companies I’ve seen with a truly agile culture. Spotify has grown a lot lately and now has hundreds of developers divided into 30 agile teams spread over 4 cities in 3 timezones. So how is this managed? Check out the article: Scaling Agile @ Spotify with Tribes, Squads, Chapters and Guilds.

(Full Story: http://blog.crisp.se/2012/11/14/henrikkniberg/scaling-agile-at-spotify )

Introduction to Chef – FOSDEM 2013 // Speaker Deck

Quick introduction to Chef given at FOSDEM 2013. The code for this presentation can be found at https://github.com/nathenharvey/wordpress-quick-start

(Full Story: https://speakerdeck.com/nathenharvey/introduction-to-chef-fosdem-2013 )