Tag Archives: ec2

Openshift Under The Hood: OpenShift on AWS EC2, Part 1: From the wheels up

The host configuration is complex enough that even for a small service it is best to use a Configuration Management System (CMS) to configure and manage the system, but the CMS can’t start work until the hosts exist and have network communications. The CMS itself must be installed and configured. Once the hosts exist and are bound together then the CMS can do the rest of the work and a clean boundary of control and access is established. This will later allow the bottom layer (establishing hosts and installing/configuring the CMS) to be replaced without affecting the actual service installation above. So the goal here is: create and connect hosts with a CMS installed using EC2.

(Full Story: http://cloud-mechanic.blogspot.com/2013/05/openshift-on-aws-ec2-part-1-from-wheels.html )

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AWS: the good, the bad and the ugly | awe.sm: the blog

we can deploy major upgrades on new hardware.
our failure plan for some non-critical systems, where perhaps up to an hour of occasional downtime is acceptable, is to monitor the box, and if it fails, spin up a new box and restore the system from backups
we can scale up in response to load events, rather than in advance of them
we can not worry about pre-launch capacity calculations

Virtual hardware doesn’t last as long as real hardware.
You need to be in more than one zone, and redundant across zones.
Multi-zone failures happen, so if you can afford it, go multi-region too.

(Full Story: AWS: the good, the bad and the ugly | awe.sm: the blog)

Deploying Ruby Applications to AWS Elastic Beanstalk with Git – AWS Ruby Blog

With the release of Ruby container support on AWS Elastic Beanstalk, it is now possible to deploy Rails (or any Rack-based) applications onto the AWS infrastructure in just a few easy steps. The container is backed by Amazon EC2 and automatically provisions the machines to use Phusion Passenger (with nginx under the hood). You can run your own local database with your application, or better yet, you can have Elastic Beanstalk automatically set you up with a MySQL database backed by Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS). All of the machines sit behind a load balancer with auto-scaling support automatically configured so you don’t even have to think about ops. Scaling is built-in.

(Full Story: Deploying Ruby Applications to AWS Elastic Beanstalk with Git – AWS Ruby Blog)

Edda – Learn the Stories of Your Cloud Deployments – Netflix Tech

Edda is a service that polls your AWS resources via AWS APIs and records the results. It allows you to quickly search through your resources and shows you how they have changed over time.

Previously this project was known within Netflix as Entrypoints (and mentioned in some blog posts), but the name was changed as the scope of the project grew. Edda (meaning “a tale of Norse mythology”), seemed appropriate for the new name, as our application records the tales of Asgard.

(Full Story: Edda – Learn the Stories of Your Cloud Deployments – Netflix Tech)

How to Run Dynamic Cloud Tests with 800 Tomcats, Amazon EC2, Jenkins

At ZeroTurnaround, we need this for testing LiveRebel with larger deployments. LiveRebel is a tool to manage JEE production and QA deployments and online updates. It is crucial that we support large clusters of machines. Testing such environments is not an easy task but luckily in 2012 it is not about buying 800 machines but only provisioning them in the cloud for some limited time. In this article I will walk you through setting up a dynamic Tomcat cluster and running some simple tests on them. (Quick note: When I started writing this article, we had only tested this out with 100 Tomcat machines, but since then we grew to be able to support 800 instances with LiveRebel and the other tools).

(Full Story: How to Run Dynamic Cloud Tests with 800 Tomcats, Amazon EC2, Jenkins)

How Amazon saved Zynga’s butt—and why Zynga built a cloud of its own | Ars Technica

For all Amazon’s scalability, the offerings can be a bit rigid. For example, you can rent an Amazon instance with a certain amount of storage and compute power, but adding a few gigabytes of memory or another processor might require buying a whole separate instance, which may have more resources than you really need.

“You can’t go to the public cloud and say I want another 64GB of memory here. They look at you and say ‘buy another instance of this type,’” Leinwand said.

Leinwand said the Amazon instance model leads to over-subscription, meaning you end up buying more storage than necessary. Internally, Zynga uses direct-attached storage striped across multiple servers, providing a big I/O performance boost and more efficient utilization, he said.

(Full Story: How Amazon saved Zynga’s butt—and why Zynga built a cloud of its own | Ars Technica)

Pinterest Architecture Update – 18 Million Visitors, 10x Growth,12 Employees, 410 TB of Data

80 million objects stored in S3 with 410 terabytes of user data, 10x what they had in August. EC2 instances have grown by 3x.

(Full Story: Pinterest Architecture Update – 18 Million Visitors, 10x Growth,12 Employees, 410 TB of Data)

AT&T; Cloud Architect

Now, complicated configurations are a thing of the past. With AT&T; Cloud Architect, there’s an automated, standardized and fast way to pick, provision and deploy servers over the web within minutes or hours, not days.

There’s no need to buy or build out your own on-premises infrastructure.

(Full Story: AT&T; Cloud Architect)

How SmugMug survived the Amazonpocalypse

  1. Spread across as many AZs as you can.
  2. Beyond mission critical? Spread across many providers.
  3. Build for failure.
  4. Understand your components and how they fail.
  5. Try to componentize your system.
  6. Test your components.
  7. Relax. Your stuff is gonna break

(Full Story: How SmugMug survived the Amazonpocalypse)

Deploy a Rails app to EC2 in less than an hour using Rubber

Enter Rubber, a Capistrano/Rails plugin that promises to automate the provisioning of both vertically and horizontally scalable multi-instance EC2 deployment configurations.

(Full Story: Deploy a Rails app to EC2 in less than an hour using Rubber)